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Friday, April 19, 2024

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Black History Matters

The death of a King and the birth of a legacy

The Kennedy King Memorial Initiative held its 56th annual commemorative event, “Still we reach: Together we can."

Divine 9 & divine interventions: Denouncing Black Greek letters

With numerous testimonials on YouTube and TikTok from ex-members of Divine Nine (D9) Black Greek sororities and fraternities, the idea of denouncing letters has been a topic of conversation through the years.

From exclusion to empowerment: Indiana Black lawyers & judges

Prior to 1900, there were very few Black lawyers practicing in and around Indianapolis. The first Black attorney admitted to the bar in Indianapolis was James T.V. Hill, who practiced law from 1882 to 1928 and was active in civic affairs.

Children’s dental health: What to know

Local dentists are helping families make sure kid’ teeth are healthy before the Tooth Fairy comes to collect. February is National Children’s Dental Health Month,...

Indiana Historical Society to tell stories of free Black settlement

The history of an early settlement of free Black and mixed-race pioneers in Indiana will have its story told. Before the end of slavery, free...

‘The whole point is community’: Indiana Pride of Color’s promise to LGBTQ+ Hoosiers

Indiana Pride of Color (INPOC) is working to create spaces for Black and brown LGBTQ+ Hoosiers to feel seen and heard. The organization is the...

Reshaping Black Hoosiers’ relationship with water

Teigha VanHester grew up surfing in Southern California. For her entire life, she has had a deep connection to water, to the extent that...

It started with a three-dollar camera from Goodwill

Dwayne Dixon picked up his first camera when he was 15 years old. It was a three-dollar camera from Goodwill. Born Feb. 18, 1949, in Indianapolis, by the time he was 18, he was drafted into the Navy and became an aircraft carrier.

That ain’t how the story goes: Wabash College’s first Black student

The story goes that he was the first Black student at Wabash College. The story goes that he was dismissed because the community did not want him there. “No one even knew his name until I finally found it in 2022,” said Timothy Lake, an associate professor of English and Black studies at Wabash College.

Impact and innovation: The Indianapolis Recorder

What began as a two-page church bulletin by co-founders George P. Stewart and William Porter, now hails as one of the top African American publications in the nation.

BLACK HISTORY MATTERS 2023 SPECIAL EDITION

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