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African-American History for Week of: November 9, 2014

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Know Your History!

While slavery in America hosts the background of Black history, the African American impact on history reaches beyond the country’s early history, as African Americans have made significant contributions to every field of endeavor, including politics, science, culture, social causes, arts, literature, athletics and the economy.

African-American History for Week of: November 9, 2014

Roger Arliner Young

 

November 9, 1964

Roger Arliner Young. Ms. Young was the first black woman to receive a doctoral degree in zoology, Ph.D. from University of Pennsylvania in 1940.

First Black Presidential Press Secretary

 

November 10, 1960

President John F. Kennedy named Andrew T. Hatcher associate press secretary. Hatcher was the first Black to hold this position.

The Bethune Museum & Archives

 

November 11, 1979

The Bethune Museum & Archives, a Depository and Center for African American Women’s History, is established in Washington, D.C.

First Black Mayor of New Orleans

 

November 12, 1977

Ernest Nathan Morial was Elected the first Black Mayor of New Orleans, Louisiana. Ernest Nathan Morial, known as Dutch Morial (October 9, 1929–December 24, 1989), was a U.S. political figure and a leading civil rights advocate. He was the first black Mayor of New Orleans, serving from 1978 to 1986.

Supreme Court upheld lower court decision which

 

November 13, 1956

Supreme Court upheld lower court decision which banned segregation on city buses in Montgomery, Alabama. Federal injunctions prohibiting segregation on the buses were served on city, state and bus company officials, December 20. At two mass meetings Montgomery Blacks called off year-long bus boycott. Buses were integrated on December 21.

First Black Elected Mayor of a Major City

 

November 13, 1967

Being elected mayor of Cleveland, Ohio made Carl Stokes the first Black to be elected mayor of a major city.

Educator and founder of Tuskegee Institute, Booker T Washington

 

November 14, 1915

Educator and founder of Tuskegee Institute, Booker T Washington, dies, in 1915.

On this day, the US Golf Association bans racial & gender discrimination.

 

November 15, 1990

On this day, the US Golf Association bans racial & gender discrimination.

About Annette 

Knowing our own history, or the history of our culture, is important because it helps us to know who we are while molding the future. Being familiar with past events gives us the ability not only to learn from past mistakes but also from the successes.

To me, the omission of any group from history teachings results in a limited understanding of history’s relationship with the present and future. Know your history.

Comments, I can be reached at:

j.annette92@yahoo.com

Twitter: @Annette92J

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