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African-American Facts for Week of: December 27, 2015

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Know Your History!

Up to the early 20th century, most American knowledge of Black history was limited to the African American struggle through slavery and emancipation. The significance of Black history is recognition of the advancements and accomplishments of a group of people once defined by the Constitution as three-fifths of a person. While slavery in America hosts the background of Black history, the African American impact on history reaches beyond the country’s early history, as African Americans have made significant contributions.

African-American Facts for Week of: December 27, 2015-16

 

December 27, 1971

 

Spingarn Medal: Jackie Robinson

Spingarn Medal awarded Jack Roosevelt (“Jackie”) Robinson, first Black in the major leagues, for his conduct on and off the baseball field.

December 27 –

 

Second Day of  Kwanzaa

Second Day of Kwanzaa – Kujichagulia (Self-Determination)

Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration held in the United States and in other nations of the Western African diaspora in the Americas. The celebration honors African heritage in African-American culture, and is observed from December 26 to January 1, culminating in a feast and gift-giving. Kwanzaa has seven core principles.

Karen Farmer

December 28, 1977

Karen Farmer becomes the first African American member of the Daughters of the American Revolution when she traces her ancestry back to William Hood, a solider in the Revolutionary War.

 

December 28 –

 

Third Day of  Kwanzaa

Third Day of Kwanzaa – Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility)

Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration held in the United States and in other nations of the Western African diaspora in the Americas. The celebration honors African heritage in African-American culture, and is observed from December 26 to January 1, culminating in a feast and gift-giving. Kwanzaa has seven core principles.

December 29, 1907

 

Robert Weaver

Robert Weaver, born on this day, beacme the first Black appointed to a presidential cabinet when President Lyndon B. Johnson named him to head the newly created Departmentof Housing and Urban Development.

December 29 –

Fourth Day of  Kwanzaa  – Ujamaa  (Cooperative Economics) To build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from them together.

Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration held in the United States and in other nations of the Western African diaspora in the Americas. The celebration honors African heritage in African-American culture, and is observed from December 26 to January 1, culminating in a feast and gift-giving.  Kwanzaa has seven core principles.

 

December 30, 1960

 

Spingarn Medal – Langston Hughes

Poet Langston Hughes presented Spingarn Medal and cited as “the poet laureate of the Negro race.”

December 30 –

 

Fifth Day of  Kwanzaa – Nia (Purpose) To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.

Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration held in the United States and in other nations of the Western African diaspora in the Americas. The celebration honors African heritage in African-American culture, and is observed from December 26 to January 1, culminating in a feast and gift-giving. Kwanzaa has seven core principles.

December 31, 1984

The first nationally broadcast telethon for the United Negro College fund is held

The first nationally broadcast telethon for the United Negro College fund is held and raises 14.1 million.

December 31 –

Sixth Day of  Kwanzaa – Kuumba (Creativity) To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.

Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration held in the United States and in other nations of the Western African diaspora in the Americas. The celebration honors African heritage in African-American culture, and is observed from December 26 to January 1, culminating in a feast and gift-giving. Kwanzaa has seven core principles.

January 1, 1916

 

First issue of Journal of Negro History

First issue of Journal of  Negro History published.

January 1 –

Seventh Day of  Kwanzaa – Imani (Faith) To believe with all our hearts in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration held in the United States and in other nations of the Western African diaspora in the Americas. The celebration honors African heritage in African-American culture, and is observed from December 26 to January 1, culminating in a feast and gift-giving.  Kwanzaa has seven core principles.

 

 

 

January 2, 1915

 

Historian, John Hope Franklin

Historian John Hope Franklin was born, 1915

John Hope Franklin (January 2, 1915 – March 25, 2009) was an American historian of the United States and former president of  Phi Beta Kappa, the Organization of American Historians, the American Historical Association, and the Southern Historical Association. Franklin is best known for his work “From Slavery to Freedom”, first published in 1947, and continually updated. More than three million copies have been sold. In 1995, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor.

About Annette: 

To me, the omission of any group from history teachings results in a limited understanding of history’s relationship with the present and future. Know your history.

Comments, I can be reached at:

j.annette92@yahoo.com

Twitter: @Annette92J

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