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Friday, September 17, 2021

Speak your Peace: Create, cultivate at ‘That Peace Open Mic’

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Indy’s artists, writers and musicians have created a space to not only hone their skills, but also form bonds in the community. Stepping into Fletcher Place Arts on the third Thursday of any month will open your eyes to the depth of talent residing in our city. 

That Peace Open Mic is a hidden gem in Indy’s art scene. It’s a stage open to all, giving a platform to everyone ranging from musicians to visual artists. You might find a girl playing an acoustic version of Chance the Rapper’s “Sunday Candy” on ukulele, right after a man performs an original hip-hop song, followed by an actress’s original monologue. Unlike many local venues, That Peace is open to attendees under 21, giving high school and college students a safe place to chill with friends.

Mariah Ivey is the visionary behind That Peace. She was inspired to create an open mic night after living in Washington, D.C., and falling in love with the art scene there. Ivey felt she could easily go out in D.C. and find places where every art form was represented and appreciated, and she wanted to bring that to Indy.

“In D.C., you could be a neo soul artist, a trap hip-hop artist or a country singer. It didn’t matter what you did; every art form was appreciated. I didn’t want to be an artist who never returned to my city. People in Indy, they get an opportunity to leave and never look back. It doesn’t leave our city’s art scene in a good place, because no one cultivates it. I felt obligated to come back and give another option to my community, because people complain there is not enough to do,” Ivey said.

At That Peace, no topic is off limits. During one show, you might see a performer singing about the pain of lost love, followed by a rap about a man’s struggles with faith, followed by a poem about racial oppression.

“There is no limit. We have had comedians, dancers. Whatever your talent is, this is a place where you can share it,” Ivey said.

That Peace has been going strong for about a year and a half now, and it is only getting better with age. Some of the performers at That Peace say the people they’ve met performing have become a second family. 

“Art is a vulnerable space, and vulnerability naturally connects community. When we aren’t vulnerable, we are not being our most authentic selves,” Ivey said. “When people are sharing their truths, their story and their experiences, they form meaningful connections. It feels like peace. It feels like family. It’s not a show.”



<p>That Peace has been going strong for about a year and a half now, and it is only getting better with age.</p>
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That Peace has been going strong for about a year and a half now, and it is only getting better with age.



<p>Unlike many local venues, That Peace is open to attendees under 21, giving high school and college students a safe place to chill with friends.</p>
<p>“><figcaption class=

Unlike many local venues, That Peace is open to attendees under 21, giving high school and college students a safe place to chill with friends.

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