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Holistic housing programs help more Indianapolis youth at risk of homelessness

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By JILL SHERIDAN

Youth at risk of homelessness in Indianapolis have new transitional housing options through the expansion of a local program.

91 Place was awarded $3.4 million in federal relief dollars from the City of Indianapolis last summer.  The money has allowed the nonprofit to purchase two additional homes, Neidhammer Coffee Co. and a new therapy center.

The transitional housing program houses 12 youth in Indianapolis with wraparound services.  91 Place Chief Advancement Officer Karynn Adamowicz said the program provides mental health help along with work training for the youth they serve.

“The way that our program is designed is based on relationships – just putting a roof over your head isn’t enough,” Adamowicz said.

The program also provides employment opportunities for the youth at Neidhammer Coffee on the Near Eastside. Adamowicz said they learn more than just how to get a job, they learn to keep it.

“In a trauma-informed environment where we can work on employability skills with the youth and help them to stay employed,” she said.

Young people who were in the foster care system and LGBTQ youth are at a higher risk of homelessness. House mentors live with the youth and provide support.

The 91 Place transitional housing is offered for up to two years for young people between the ages of 16-24.

The funding has allowed them to expand mental health services for high-risk youth by 50 percent. 

The grant was part of Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett’s $150 million violence reduction plan, funded by American Rescue Plan funding.

Youth at risk of homelessness in Indianapolis have new transitional housing options through the expansion of a local program.

91 Place was awarded $3.4 million in federal relief dollars from the City of Indianapolis last summer.  The money has allowed the nonprofit to purchase two additional homes, Neidhammer Coffee Co. and a new therapy center.

The transitional housing program houses 12 youth in Indianapolis with wraparound services.  91 Place Chief Advancement Officer Karynn Adamowicz said the program provides mental health help along with work training for the youth they serve.

“The way that our program is designed is based on relationships – just putting a roof over your head isn’t enough,” Adamowicz said.

The program also provides employment opportunities for the youth at Neidhammer Coffee on the Near Eastside. Adamowicz said they learn more than just how to get a job, they learn to keep it.

“In a trauma-informed environment where we can work on employability skills with the youth and help them to stay employed,” she said.

Young people who were in the foster care system and LGBTQ youth are at a higher risk of homelessness. House mentors live with the youth and provide support.

The 91 Place transitional housing is offered for up to two years for young people between the ages of 16-24.

The funding has allowed them to expand mental health services for high-risk youth by 50 percent. 

The grant was part of Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett’s $150 million violence reduction plan, funded by American Rescue Plan funding.

Contact WFYI city government and policy reporter Jill Sheridan at jsheridan@wfyi.org. Follow on Twitter: @JillASheridan.

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